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Compassion • Commitment • Change
Fayette Humane Society
Current News Releases

This page has all of our current news releases. News media may contact us regarding news items by email only at badams@fayettehumanesociety.com


8-13-2019
Three people receive animal cruelty related charges

WASHINGTON C.H., OH- Fayette Regional Humane Society (FRHS) humane agents have served three people with charges relating to animal cruelty since last Thursday. All three will be arraigned at the Washington C.H. Municipal Court on Wednesday.

Patty A. Hammond, age 29 of Washington C.H., was served with one second degree misdemeanor charge of ‘abandoning animals.’ Hammond left her dog last Monday at her previous residence in Washington C.H., to stay with her boyfriend at a Bogus Rd. home. The investigating humane agent said that Hammond had no intentions on returning to get the dog.

Ernest R. Vorhees, age 35 of Washington C.H., was served with two second degree misdemeanor charges of ‘prohibitions concerning companion animals.’ Humane Agents visited Vorhees’s home on July 23 where they found an underweight dog with significant hair loss, sores and flakey skin. Vorhees surrendered the nine-year-old Pit Bull/Lab mix dog that was also infested with fleas to humane agents. The dog, named Hershey, was transported to the humane society’s clinic where he tested for hookworms and weighed only 32 pounds. Hershey gained nearly 13 pounds after a week and a half in FRHS care. Hershey has since been adopted into a new home. Humane Agents served Vorhees with the charges late Friday night with the assistance of Washington C.H. police officers, after having difficulties at making contact with him multiple times throughout the past two and a half weeks.

Anndrea McCullough, age 28 of Columbus was served with five second degree misdemeanor charges of ‘prohibitions concerning companion animals’ on Monday. It was reported to humane agents on August 1 at 11:46 a.m., that a lady’s vehicle had a flat tire and parked it at a residence during the previous night at 8 p.m. The caller reported that while mowing, two kittens were noticed barely moving inside of the car. Humane Agents responded to the E. Temple and Blackstone St. location and found cats and kittens inside of the vehicle. Although the vehicle had one cracked window, it had an ambient temperature reading of 93 degrees Fahrenheit inside of the car. The driver door was unlocked by humane agents where they gained entry and found a total of three kittens and two adult cats with a litterbox and no water. The very skittish adult cats escaped out of an open door while a humane agent was trying to capture them. Humane Agents canvased nearby properties to search for the cats at different times but were unsuccessful at finding them. The eight-week-old kittens were transported to the humane society’s clinic where a veterinarian examined and reported all of the kittens slightly dehydrated, two of them had slightly elevated temperatures. According to the veterinarian, removal of the kittens was necessary to ensure their survival, further stating that the kittens were left in a potentially dangerous situation, which required immediate intervention.

The Fayette Regional Humane Society is a non-profit (501(c)(3), volunteer organization. They receive less than 2% of their support from governmental organizations and therefore must rely on donations, grants and fundraising to carry out their mission. The Humane Society is the only organization in Fayette County able to respond to calls about abused, neglected and injured domesticanimals, 24 hours per day, seven days per week. To learn more about the Fayette Regional Humane Society, please visit their website at www.fayettehumanesociety.com

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6-4-2019
FRHS called to assist Pike County Sheriff's Office with large scale dog removal

PIKE COUNTY, OH- Fayette Regional Humane Society (FRHS) Humane Agents and administrative staff with the Ross County Humane Society (RCHS), traveled to a residence in southwest Pike County yesterday afternoon, after FRHS received a call for help from the Pike County Sheriff’s Office.

 

FRHS received the call for help at 1:04 p.m. on Monday afternoon from Pike County Sheriff’s Office Chief Deputy Bentley. According to FRHS, Bentley contacted Chief Humane Agent Brad Adams, stating that his deputies arrived to a residence with a deceased person with approximately 65 to 70 dogs inside. Bentley told Adams that they’ve never had a situation like that, and didn’t have the resources to remove that many dogs.

 

“I explained to Chief Deputy Bentley that we were unable to house a large number of dogs, however, I did offer man power between myself and Humane Agent Nick Marando, as well as both vans for transport of dogs.” said Brad Adams, Chief Humane Agent “We also offered to take as many dogs that we would take as many dogs that we could, into our downtown facility, and would reach out to other humane societies in the area to also assist.

 

Adams contacted Ross County Humane Society Executive Director Jenn Thomas and asked if they would join the rescue operation, and without pause, Thomas and her staff loaded cages in their van and followed FRHS agents to the Pike County location.

 

Nearly 30 dogs and puppies were transported back to the Fayette Regional Humane Society and Ross County Humane Society for housing, care and treatment, and to be exact, 13 went to FRHS and 15 to the RCHS. The remainder of the dogs were placed at the Pike County Dog Shelter and nearby residents who were willing to help. The breeds were Shih Tzu and Shih Tzu mixes.

 

According to FRHS, some of the dogs were so matted that when they were bathed and groomed, sores were found on their skin from the matted hair pulling on their skin, while some dogs had hair loss. Flea infestation was present, and Ross County Humane Society discovered missing eyes from dogs that they took.

 

“While we were transporting the dogs back to our downtown animal care and adoption center last evening, staff was preparing for the dogs and puppies arrival by setting up their kennels with food, water, bedding and toys.” said Adams

“Although all of dogs were very friendly, a couple of them are still scared but still wags their tail when staff socializes with them.

 

Veterinary Technician Danyel Bageant and Adoption Coordinator Bobbi Honicker told Catherine Yeoman, owner of The Good Dog Groomery about the situation, and without hesitation, invited them to bring the dogs for a complete grooming as a contribution to the rescue. 

 

“It was a great team effort between all who were involved in yesterday’s rescue.” said Nick Marando, humane agent

 

About 52 dogs were removed by the Fayette Regional Humane Society, Ross County Humane Society, Pike County Sheriff’s Office and the Pike County Dog Warden.

 

FRHS says that this was a sad situation all around for the family and friends who lost a loved one and for the dogs and puppies in the situation. The family and friends has their deepest condolences during this difficult time. FRHS is also thankful for the Ross County Humane Society with their joint rescue effort and all of the animal care staff who helped with the care of the dogs and puppies.

 

FRHS says that rescues like this that are unexpected can be costly with providing the animals with needed healthcare, vaccines, deworming, blood testing, flea treatments, and the spaying or neutering to prepare them for adoption. Donations would not only help with the small amount of dogs that we took into our care but also future rescues. If anyone would like to make a contribution to help prepare the dogs and puppies for their new homes, please click on “Donate Now” at www.fayettehumanesociety.com or by mailing it to 153 S. Main St., Ste 3. – Washington C.H., OH 43160


The Fayette Regional Humane Society is a non-profit (501(c)(3), volunteer organization. They receive less than 2% of their support from governmental organizations and therefore must rely on donations, grants and fundraising to carry out their mission. The Humane Society is the only organization in Fayette County able to respond to calls about abused, neglected and injured domesticanimals, 24 hours per day, seven days per week. To learn more about the Fayette Regional Humane Society, please visit their website at www.fayettehumanesociety.com

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5-9-2019
Ross County man pleaded guilty to cruelty to animals in cow case

ROSS COUNTY., OH- John P. Balzer, 58 of Frankfort, pleaded guilty to a Cruelty to Animal charge during a pre-trial hearing in Chillicothe Municipal Court last Friday. Balzer was sentenced with a $300 fine, 1 year probation, and was ordered to complete a livestock care program through the Farm Bureau or a similar program approved by the probation department. The sentence was handed down after Balzer was originally charged with three counts of Cruelty to Animals, each a second degree misdemeanor. Ross County Humane Agents responded to a call located in Southwest Ross County in late January, concerning dead yearling calves. When the agents arrived to investigate, they observed multiple dead calves and found three still alive laying in deep mud. Another live calf was found inside of a hay feeder hanging through the bars. The uninjured calf was quickly freed by a humane agent. The three calves that were found alive, died soon after being pulled from the mud. According to humane agents, when the owner was asked if he noticed the cows down in the mud, he stated that he did on the previous day. He also told agents that he figured they didn't have much longer to live, and would probably be dead by the next day. “It is inhumane when an animal is suffering and a person fails to remedy the situation.” said Nick Marando, humane agent The Ross County Humane Society contracts with the Fayette Regional Humane Society to provide humane agent services to the Ross County area.

**NOTE** The John Balzer named in this press release is not the same person who serves as the Adena Local School Superintendent

The Fayette Regional Humane Society is a non-profit (501(c)(3), volunteer organization. They receive less than 2% of their support from governmental organizations and therefore must rely on donations, grants and fundraising to carry out their mission. The Humane Society is the only organization in Fayette County able to respond to calls about abused, neglected and injured domesticanimals, 24 hours per day, seven days per week. To learn more about the Fayette Regional Humane Society, please visit their website at www.fayettehumanesociety.com

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5-8-2019
Hebb pleaded guilty to disorderly conduct in kitten death case

WASHINGTON C.H., OH- Alex Hebb, 22 of Washington C.H., who was originally charged with Prohibitions Concerning Animals in November, pleaded guilty to Disorderly Conduct prior to his jury trial hearing last week. Hebb received a $100 fine, 30 days jail, 17 days credited for time served, and 13 days jail suspended. Hebb was also placed on probation for one year, ordered to complete mental health evaluation, and not to own animals for five years.

Officers with the Washington C.H. Police Department (WPD) and a humane agent with the Fayette Regional Humane Society (FRHS), responded to an apartment on Forest Street in November, after a kitten was killed. The kitten was removed from a garbage container behind the apartment, and transported to FRHS where its body was examined by Executive Director Dr. Lee Schrader.

“Apparently the kitten had been injured and it was killed in an attempt to end its suffering.” said Brad Adams, chief humane agent

Hebb was originally arraigned in the Washington C.H. Municipal Court on November 13, 2018, and pleaded guilty to Prohibitions Concerning Animals, but changed his plea to ‘not guilty’ during his sentencing hearing on November 16. Samuel Nye, 31 of Chillicothe who was also involved in the incident, pleaded guilty to Prohibitions Concerning Animals during a court hearing on December 4. Nye received a $100 fine, 30 days suspended jail, one year probation, complete a mental health evaluation, and not to own animals for five years.

The Fayette Regional Humane Society is a non-profit (501(c)(3), volunteer organization. They receive less than 2% of their support from governmental organizations and therefore must rely on donations, grants and fundraising to carry out their mission. The Humane Society is the only organization in Fayette County able to respond to calls about abused, neglected and injured domesticanimals, 24 hours per day, seven days per week. To learn more about the Fayette Regional Humane Society, please visit their website at www.fayettehumanesociety.com

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3-19-2019
Neglected Great Dane case brings 5 years no owning animals; Dog has a new family

WASHINGTON C.H., OH- Brittany R. Scott, 28, Bloomingburg pleaded guilty to a charge of Prohibitions Concerning Companion Animals at a pre-trial hearing in Washington C.H. Municipal Court on Tuesday. Scott was ordered to not own any animals for five years, fined $750, and sentenced to 90 days in jail. $600 of that fine and the 90 day jail sentence was suspended, provided that Scott doesn’t have any similar offenses for five years. Fayette Regional Humane Society (FRHS) agents responded to a Bloomingburg on January 2, after receiving reports from citizens concerned about the welfare of a dog inside of a residence. Humane Agents discovered an emaciated Great Dane with her spine, ribs and hipbone being prominent. The dog, named Galaxy, was transported to the FRHS clinic where she weighed only 66 pounds, had internal parasites of round worms, and according to a veterinarian, bilateral entropion with inflammatory change in her eyes. A veterinary technician said that her body was covered in dried urine and feces. Galaxy was nearly 25 pounds underweight for her size, according to Executive Director Dr. Lee Schrader. Scott showed humane agents an empty four-pound-bag of dog food that she gave the dog within a week prior to the agents arriving to the property. “Four pounds of dog food for an entire week is simply inadequate and not enough nutrition for a large breed of dog like a Great Dane.” said Brad Adams, chief humane agent “The dog didn’t become severely emaciated over a period of a week. The weight loss occurred over a longer period of time.” Galaxy has since been treated for the internal parasites, had surgery to correct the entropion, and has gained the appropriate weight for the Great Dane breed. Galaxy was adopted by her foster parents after she recovered from medical treatment and surgery. “After seeing how bad she was neglected, my wife and I knew that Galaxy would never have to suffer again like that in our home.” said Ben North, adopter “Galaxy was so sweet. All she wanted was to be held and loved. She just didn't want to be away from anybody.” According to North, Galaxy not only shares her new home with him and his wife, but also two other dogs and three cats. “She is big on snuggles and not just with us, but also Duke, our other Great Dane. Galaxy loves playing outside, running around with the other dogs. She discovered couches make the best beds, not crates. Her favorite thing to do is play with her brother Duke. She is so full of life and energy and loves to play tug with him. When they get tired, she wants nothing more than to climb on a couch and take a nap beside my wife or myself.” added North Humane Agent Nick Marando is happy that Galaxy found a wonderful home. “I am thrilled that she was adopted by a very caring and loving family. The adopters already had a Great Dane and was familiar with the breed, so the adoption was a great match.” said Marando 

The Fayette Regional Humane Society is a non-profit (501(c)(3), volunteer organization. They receive less than 2% of their support from governmental organizations and therefore must rely on donations, grants and fundraising to carry out their mission. The Humane Society is the only organization in Fayette County able to respond to calls about abused, neglected and injured domesticanimals, 24 hours per day, seven days per week. To learn more about the Fayette Regional Humane Society, please visit their website at www.fayettehumanesociety.com

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3-13-2019
Man pleaded not guilty in dog starvation case

WASHINGTON C.H., OH- Jamie Jones, 43 of Washington C.H., pleaded not guilty to two counts of prohibitions concerning companion animals in Washington C.H. Municipal Court on Wednesday. Fayette Regional Humane Society (FRHS) Humane Agents recently responded to a concern about an underweight dog at a Fayette County home, where an emaciated pit bull mix was confined by a log chain to a dog house, without food or water. The five-year-old dog, named Marcus, was surrendered by the owner and transported to the FRHS clinic to be examined by Executive Director Dr. Lee Schrader. According to FRHS, Marcus was severely emaciated, weighing only 43 pounds with multiple open sores on his back and pressure sores on his hind area. Jones told humane agents that he lost his wallet and couldn’t afford to feed the dog, and only fed the dog every three or four days. “There is never an excuse to let an animal get into this type of condition” said Nick Marando, humane agent The veterinary report stated that there were multiple dermal ulcers over boney prominences as well as on his (Marcus’) ears. Unfortunately Marcus passed away later that night. "He was very thin and weak.” said Dr. Schrader, executive director "Despite our best efforts, he passed away." Marcus' body was transported to the Ohio State University Veterinary Medical Center for a forensic necropsy (autopsy) to determine the cause of death. A special test was also sent to Perdue University. A post-mortem examination showed that he died due to a mesenteric volvulus, a twisting of the intestinal tract that is nearly universally fatal. “Although Marcus was weak and in pain, he still laid his head in all of our laps to be petted and loved.” said Brad Adams, Chief Humane Agent “We wish Marcus was still with us. He was such a sweet loving dog and would’ve brought a lot of joy to a family.” It has cost FRHS nearly $790 for medical testing and forensic necropsy. FRHS has received $350 of those expenses through donations on social media. If anyone would like to make a donation to help, please visit their website at www.fayettehumanesociety and click on Donate Now, or mail contribution to the Fayette Regional Humane Society at 153 S. Main St., Ste. 3, Washington C.H., OH 43160.

The Fayette Regional Humane Society is a non-profit (501(c)(3), volunteer organization. They receive less than 2% of their support from governmental organizations and therefore must rely on donations, grants and fundraising to carry out their mission. The Humane Society is the only organization in Fayette County able to respond to calls about abused, neglected and injured domesticanimals, 24 hours per day, seven days per week. To learn more about the Fayette Regional Humane Society, please visit their website at www.fayettehumanesociety.com

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2-19-2019
Humane Agents looking for dog owners in abandonment case

A Fayette Regional Humane Society (FRHS) agent and dog wardens responded to a vacated sleeping room on State Route 62, where two dogs were left behind. A Washington C.H. Municipal Court bailiff reported the incident on January 14, after finding the dogs in the vacant room while serving an eviction. The two, one-and-a-half-year-old Pit Bull and Pit Bull mix dogs ran out of the sleeping room, where they were captured by dog wardens and transported to the Fayette County Dog Shelter to be housed. According to FRHS, a humane agent made contact with the dog owners who claimed that they were stranded in Georgia after their vehicle, license, and other belongings were stolen. “The dog owners were unable to produce any documentation regarding their stolen vehicle and other property, because they didn’t report the incident to any Georgia authorities.” said Brad Adams, chief humane agent When the dog owners were asked why they didn’t report their property stolen, they told Adams they would go to jail for not having their license. The two dogs have since been neutered, vaccinated, heartworm tested, flea treated, micro-chipped, and adopted into new homes, according to FRHS. As for the dog owners, charges of abandonment are pending. “I’ve not been able to make any further contact with the dog owners since our initial conversation, so I am unsure of their current whereabouts.” said Adams “I do have a couple ‘welcome home gifts’ of abandonment charges waiting on them if they return or are found.” If anyone has information on the whereabouts of 20-year-old Paige Chapman and 31-year-old Eric Dickson, please contact FRHS Humane Agents at 740-335-8126. 

The Fayette Regional Humane Society is a non-profit (501(c)(3), volunteer organization. They receive less than 2% of their support from governmental organizations and therefore must rely on donations, grants and fundraising to carry out their mission. The Humane Society is the only organization in Fayette County able to respond to calls about abused, neglected and injured domesticanimals, 24 hours per day, seven days per week. To learn more about the Fayette Regional Humane Society, please visit their website at www.fayettehumanesociety.com

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2-7-2019
Adopt love at FRHS

The Fayette Regional Humane Society is hosting 'Adopt Love', a special adoption event with reduced fees for the cats and kittens. Adopting from a humane society gives a lifetime of love. “All of our adoptable kitties have been vaccinated, spayed or neutered, dewormed, treated for fleas and microchipped.” said Brad Adams, outreach director There are currently 22 cats housed at the FRHS Adoption Center, located in downtown Washington Court House. This means there is a large variety of personalities where adopters can meet their forever match. “They need someone to care for them and show them love.” said Bobbi Honicker, adoption coordinator. The adoption donation for cats will be $20 and $50 for kittens. 

The Fayette Regional Humane Society is a non-profit (501(c)(3), volunteer organization. They receive less than 2% of their support from governmental organizations and therefore must rely on donations, grants and fundraising to carry out their mission. The Humane Society is the only organization in Fayette County able to respond to calls about abused, neglected and injured domesticanimals, 24 hours per day, seven days per week. To learn more about the Fayette Regional Humane Society, please visit their website at www.fayettehumanesociety.com

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1-16-2019
Bloomingburg woman charged after humane agents find emaciated dog

BLOOMINGBURG, OH- Bloomingburg woman charged after humane agents find emaciated dog Fayette Regional Humane Society (FRHS) agents responded to a Bloomingburg home recently, after receiving reports from citizens, concerned about the welfare of a dog inside of a residence. Humane Agents discovered an emaciated Great Dane with her spine, ribs, and hipbone being prominent. "I'm glad people call us when they have a concern about the welfare of an animal so that we can remedy the situation." said Nick Marando, charging humane agent The dog, named Galaxy, was transported to the FRHS clinic where she weighed only 66 pounds, had internal parasites of round worms, and according to a veterinarian, bilateral entropion with inflammatory change in her eyes. A veterinary technician said that her body was covered in dried urine and feces. Brittany R. Scott, 28, Bloomingburg was charged with two counts of cruelty to animals relating to the lack of nutrition and veterinary care of the dog. She pleaded not guilty in the Washington C.H. Municipal Court on Wednesday. Galaxy was nearly 25 pounds underweight for her size, according to Executive Director Dr. Lee Schrader. She has been treated for the internal parasites, had surgery to correct the entropion, and has gained 10 pounds since being under FRHS care. Galaxy is a very sweet and affectionate dog. Her foster parent noted that she is good with other dogs, house trained, and knows how to sit on command. FRHS is happy to report that she has been adopted into a new loving home.

The Fayette Regional Humane Society is a non-profit (501(c)(3), volunteer organization. They receive less than 2% of their support from governmental organizations and therefore must rely on donations, grants and fundraising to carry out their mission. The Humane Society is the only organization in Fayette County able to respond to calls about abused, neglected and injured domesticanimals, 24 hours per day, seven days per week. To learn more about the Fayette Regional Humane Society, please visit their website at www.fayettehumanesociety.com

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